17 Excellent Quotes on the Power of Goal Setting

Marina Martinez

Posted by Marina Martinez
July 29, 2015

goal_setting_quotes

 

“If you aim at nothing, you’ll hit it every time,” goes the familiar saying from Zig Ziglar.

It’s true at work, and it’s true in our personal lives. When we don’t have clear goals, we wallow in aimless tasks and reach blindly for the future.

At Khorus, we have the privilege of working with our customers to bring great goal setting—and the renewed clarity, focus, and purpose that comes with it—to entire companies. Here are some of our favorite quotes on the topic of goal power, from thinkers old and new. 

On why to have goals in the first place:

1. Seth Godin

“The thing about goals is that living without them is a lot more fun, in the short run. It seems to me, though, that the people who get things done, who lead, who grow and who make an impact . . . those people have goals.” —Seth's Blog

This is truth, and it kind of hurts. Setting a goal is an acknowledgment that you’re not where you want to be, that there’s work to be done. But as Godin points out, it’s worth it in the end.

2. Peter Drucker

Drucker_goals

“The young knowledge worker whose job is too small to challenge and test his abilities either leaves or declines rapidly into premature middle age, soured, cynical, unproductive.” —The Effective Executive

Set some challenging goals! You don’t want to age prematurely, do you?

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5 Ways to Build Employee Engagement from the Top

Joel Trammell

Posted by Joel Trammell
July 22, 2015

Everyone plays a role in keeping engagement levels high—especially the CEO. 

 

Peter Drucker once said, “Accept the fact that we have to treat almost anybody as a volunteer.” 

Think for about that for a second. If your employees became volunteers—if the direct deposits stopped hitting their bank accounts—would they give another thought to the mission of your company?

For most of them, the answer is probably no. Just look at widely cited employee engagement data from Gallup showing that less than a third of workers are engaged (and less than 15 percent worldwide). Despite millions of dollars pouring into engagement programs each year, we continue to struggle to get people to actually care about their jobs. What are business leaders to do?

The shift of mind-set suggested by Drucker is a great place to start. We have to consider the fact that our best employees are in a sense volunteering to work for us: they could easily get jobs elsewhere. If we want them to give discretionary effort and connect with the company’s purpose, we have to convince them that it’s worth their while.

Whose responsibility is that? Everyone plays a role here—including employees themselves, as both Gallup and Marshall Goldsmith have recently argued. But to build an environment where most employees are invested in their jobs most of the time, the CEO has to step up and lay the groundwork.

Here are five essential ways to build engagement from the top.

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3 Things to Do in Khorus Each Week [for CEOs]

Joel Trammell

Posted by Joel Trammell
July 16, 2015

You breathe a sigh of relief: everyone’s goals are in Khorus for the quarter.

You now have a map of what employees are going to do for the next 90 days. You’ll be alerted early when problems crop up. And thanks to company-wide forecasting, you’ll know how the quarter is likely to play out.

That insight is going help you steer the company through the coming months—and if you take the following three actions in Khorus every week, you’ll reinforce behaviors that make the platform and your team even more powerful.

1. Thank people for honest updates.

It takes guts to downgrade a goal to red for the week. The employee is telling her peers and the chain of command that she’s not performing like she expected, whether it’s under her control or not.

As CEO, you need weekly updates to be honest. If people sugarcoat them to look good, you'll be living in a fool's paradise—and you won't be too happy when the real situation is revealed later.

Every week, look for a chance to thank someone who’s flagged red on a goal. Tell them you appreciate and rely on their honest input. Show them that you aren’t going to shoot the messenger. Remind them that Khorus updates are there to help everyone solve problems together, not to allocate blame or rank people’s value.

Khorus_bad_update

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It’s Here! Say Hello to a New and Improved Khorus

Khorus Team

Posted by Khorus Team
July 10, 2015

We want Khorus to be as intuitive and easy to use as possible, so we're excited to announce we've officially released a new, redesigned version of our web app.

Now it's simpler than ever to work on shared goals, communicate up, down, and across the company, and get a lens on what's going on anywhere in the organization.

The new Khorus has all the same features the previous version had, plus a few new ones. 

1. New home page

The new Khorus home page is designed to reinforce the fundamentals of the business every time you log in. Get:

  • An at-a-glance view of company goals
  • Reminders of actions to take in Khorus (goal updates, approvals, etc.)
  • A mini-dashboard of usage metrics (who hasn’t updated goals, who doesn’t have goals, and who hasn’t finalized goals)
 
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Working with a Purpose Matters to Millennials

Philip Parker

Posted by Philip Parker
July 8, 2015

Millennial_employees

 

Millennials want to know why their work matters.

(Oh, and so does literally everyone else.)

 

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Goal Setting Helps You Win in the Game of Business

Gabe Martinez

Posted by Gabe Martinez
July 1, 2015

Drew Brees gets it right on the power of goals. But are we using goal power fully in today's workplaces?

 


 

Between the months of February and June, we watch in awe as teams in various sports lift the coveted trophy. We saw that this year with the New England Patriots, Duke Blue Devils, Chicago Blackhawks, and the media-darling Golden State Warriors.

However, many of us fans never think about the road it took to get here. Each team, no matter the sport, set out with a clear goal: to win the championship.

On a recent drive to work, I happened to hear a radio interview with New Orleans Saints quarterback (and fellow Austinite) Drew Brees. Because I work at Khorus, where we help people set and pursue goals, I was struck by what he had to say on the topic.

Discussing what it’s like to return to mini-camps and workouts before the start of the season, Brees said,

"Goals give you a purpose, give you direction. Goals give you something to work for each and every day. Otherwise I don’t think you’re getting the best out of yourself. Goals keep you hungry. You’re always chasing something."

He’s exactly right, and it applies to more than football.

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